Union Station parking garage

The parking garage at Union Station offers some great views of the tracks, the surrounding streets, and some interior drama.

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Union Station

Union Station

Escalators to the parking garage at Union Station
Escalators to the parking garage at Union Station
Escalators to the parking garage at Union Station
Escalators to the parking garage at Union Station
Union Station parking garage
Union Station parking garage
View north from Union Station parking garage
View north from Union Station parking garage
View north from Union Station parking garage
View north from Union Station parking garage
View of the trains from the Union Station parking garage
View of the trains from the Union Station parking garage

Washington Post demolition

The Washington Post moved to a new building on L St. in 1951, and expanded to another building around the corner on 15th St. in 1972. After selling the paper to Jeff Bezos in 2013, the Post sold its buildings to Carr Properties. Carr is demolishing the buildings and will put up a large new complex, with Fannie Mae as the anchor tenant. Here is how the demolition looked this weekend:

and demolished in 2016.

and demolished in 2016.

and demolished in 2016.

The demolition photos are from the L St. building. The 15th St. building has not yet been demolished but is stripped bare:

Demolition of the Washington Post building

For comparison, here is how the facade looked a couple of hours after the surprise news of the sale to Bezos:

Washington Post is sold

The Post buildings were not granted any historical status, because of their undistinguished architecture. For the 1972 expansion on 15th St., Kay Graham had hired I.M. Pei, hoping for an imposing building. He proposed an expensive design, with the building resembling a typewriter. After spending $2 million and 4 years, the Post decided it was too expensive, and went with Albert Kahn Associates, who had designed the 1951 building on L St.

Jackie

It was incredibly powerful to see the recreation of the Kennedy funeral yesterday along 14th St. Natalie Portman is Jackie, and Peter Sarsgaard is Robert Kennedy.
Jackie and Robert Kennedy in the funeral procession
Jackie and Robert Kennedy in the funeral procession
Pulling the caisson
Kennedy's caisson
Funeral procession
Riderless horse
The most heart-breaking sight is Caroline Kennedy starting out the window of the limousine.

Funeral procession
Earlier in the afternoon, cast members and extras were around the Hamilton on 14th Street in classic 1960’s style.
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Movie extras
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There was a large production unit managing the wardrobes, limousine, and other production elements on 14th Street.
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This weekend was the only filming scheduled in D.C., the remaining filming will take place elsewhere.

The Streetcar Opens

At the opening of the streetcar on Saturday morning, Mayor Bowser spoke and people cheered and waved banners that had been distributed to the crowd.
Listening to Mayor Bowser's speech.
Among the cheering crowd, there were pockets of anger. I can easily understand this – I had just taken the X2 bus to get there, which has always been a serviceable way to go along the same route as the streetcar but in no way a fun form of transportation. From that point of view, the streetcar seems like a pure upscale indulgence.

The Amalgamated Transit Union was also there with a small organized protest on pay issues.
D.C. Streetcar opening
Amalgamated Transit Union protest, reflected in the windows of the streetcar
D.C. Streetcar opening
The first rides were just for VIP’s:
D.C. Streetcar opening
Shortly after that, streetcars started running in both directions, turning around near a patient crowd waiting for rides at Union Station.
D.C. Streetcar opening
D.C. Streetcar opening
The streetcar will be free for the first six months, and run on Monday through Saturdays.